Wednesday, January 07, 2009

In the Diner

Sitting here this morning reading a book on worship, while hearing Carrie Underwood wail in the background about her man (I don't know whether he is supposed to be her husband or her boyfriend) chatting up another girl in the bar, buying her drinks and "thinking he's gonna get lucky" while she vandalizes his car outside singing "Maybe next time he'll think before he cheats."

Perhaps he will ... though I won't hold my breath since a lot of men aren't terribly thoughtful in these matters.

I am reminded that this is the same Carrie Underwood that sings "Jesus Take the Wheel."

I have to wonder if she wanted Him to take the wheel of that "pretty little souped-up four wheel drive" she was vandalizing. Maybe if Jesus had taken the wheel, her boyfriend would be home with her, only involved in a sinful relationship with her rather than this other chick.

I remember reading people who spoke of the great testimony of Carrie Underwood singing "Jesus Take the Wheel." I remember people saying what great spiritual encouragement they got from that song, and how great it was that someone in mainstream country music was so open about their Christianity.

I remember thinking to myself, "What idiots ... Some people are so gullible." Of course, I would never say that publicly, since I like to keep such judgmental thoughts about sources of spiritual encouragement to myself. But privately, I admit to questioning the spiritual discernment of those who find food for their soul in Carrie Underwood.

Now, admittedly I don't know Carrie Underwood, her heart, or marital status, or her living arrangements, but please forgive me for wondering about the seriousness of her desire for Jesus to take the wheel. And please forgive me for wondering why people think that is a great testimony of a Jesus-centered life.

Whatever she might be, she ain't no Isaac Watts or Charles Wesley. She's not even Fanny Crosby or Ron Hamilton.

May God spare us from a Jesus who drives like that.

6 comments:

J. Brian McKillop said...

Larry said:

I remember thinking to myself, "What idiots ... Some people are so gullible." Of course, I would never say that publicly, since I like to keep such judgmental thoughts about sources of spiritual encouragement to myself. But privately, I admit to questioning the spiritual discernment of those who find food for their soul in Carrie Underwood.

I am so glad you kept your judgmental thoughts to yourself, but you are right on. No wonder the church looks like the world... because it is.

theologshmeolog said...

Good thoughts Larry. It does seem that the more "Jesus" becomes mainstream, the more His name becomes as generic as "God" in the mainstream. With this then comes a stripping of any real meaning of all that "Jesus" or "God" truly entails. Why do Christians, incl fundies, continue to fall for the kind of foolishness that accompanies a song like that? It might as well be "Drop Kick me Jesus Through the Goalposts of Life..."

Ed Franklin said...

I think she is referring to that "another Jesus" of 2 Cor 11.

Anonymous said...

You're all over-reaching..."Before He Cheats" is simply a song about betrayal and the grief (and anger) that results. Proverbs 6 speaks of this:

"The one who commits adultery with a woman is lacking sense;
He who would destroy himself does it.
33 Wounds and disgrace he will find,
And his reproach will not be blotted out.
34 For jealousy enrages a man,
And he will not spare in the day of vengeance.
35 He will not accept any ransom,
Nor will he be satisfied though you give many gifts."

Larry said...

Yes, and about revenge, vandalism, and the like.

Somehow, the way that Proverbs puts it is entirely different.

But I think you may have missed the point. The point was actually about the idea that Carrie Underwood was a great Christian testimony for singing "Jesus take the Wheel." She wasn't.

Anonymous said...

yes, people can be very foolish...

Her modesty is a big issue for me--I don't consider her a role model for anyone, really.

But the lyrics of "Jesus Take the Wheel" (which I just went and looked up) are actually not bad.

We praise long-dead artists/composers of whom we would disapprove, were they still alive. We see beauty and structure in their compositions that glorifies the creativity of God.

I think this little piece could be used to turn someone's mind to Christ.

Eh, probably not worth quibbling over.